How to Set Up Our Raspberry Pi microSD Card

You are about to have so much fun.

We assume you have a Raspberry Pi and know how to put it together. Simply place our Fedora Security Spin (FSS) microSD card into your Pi and power it up.

You’ll be prompted for a user name and password, of course. Your user name is hacker and your password is hack2live. Do not leave this password unchanged! Open a terminal and type:

passwd

and then enter a good, stout password. Twice, to prove you can. Don’t forget it; this is for-real Unix and won’t make things easy for you if your do.

Be sharp about installing updates as they become available; Fedora will let you know about these.

Notes on Fedora on Raspberry Pi

This isn’t an installer. This is a ready-to-go pre-installed FSS environment designed for hacking students and security testers.

Our Pi card ships with VNC Server already set up and running. Once you know the IP address of your Pi (an nmap scan is a nice way) you can use any VNC client and connect on port 5910.

The sshd daemon is running too, so you can ssh to your Pi’s IP address using the default credentials.

The screen saver is disabled for two reasons. First, if your Pi goes into standby, it shuts down the wifi adapter and is notoriously bad at bringing it back up. Second, because you Pi doesn’t have a BIOS/CMOS, it doesn’t know what time it is at boot until it syncs to a time server, so as soon as you log in, the screen saver will lock you out, forcing you to log in again. If the screen saver is important to you the configuration can be set up in the GUI desktop tool.

This installation uses the default Fedora ARM kernel. There are other distros available that use an out-of-tree kernel, usually based on Ada’s work, to enable things like tiny touch screens. Compatibility with some of the testing tools is problematic, my kernel developer tells me, so for the sake of a good hacking experience we’ve stuck to the mainstream kernel. This is cool. As new kernels come out you’ll get them (or refuse the update if you want, but you don’t, usually).